October 2016

Buoys in the Carolinas to be Replaced

Three buoys in the Carolinas coastal waters will soon be replaced.  

Figure 1. Pictured are the UNCW Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (CORMP) buoys on the SECOORA Data portal. Scheduled for deployment in the first week of the November, the updated buoys will replace the currently deployed FRP2, ILM2 and ILM3 stations (highlighted). FRP2 buoy stopped transmitting data on October 7 during Hurricane Matthew.

 

Over the past months the UNCW CORMP team restored old buoys, designed and tested the data collection, sensor and telemetry packages, and upgraded the solar power systems. 

Figure 2. Chris LaClair of UNCW CORMP is welding on new solar panel frames. The buoys rely on photovoltaic panels to provide power for sensors, data loggers and communications. Image Credit: Brett Bolton, UNCW CORMP

The CORMP team replaces the buoys with new systems approximately every year. Due to last minute changes and failures at other stations, the current ILM2 buoy has been in the water since 2014. Upgrades to the systems being deployed include a more robust power system as well as secondary meteorological sensors. Increased power on the buoy will allow for more data transmission and having a secondary sensor onboard insures continuity in data collection.

Figure 3. Buoys are on the truck ready to travel to the UGA’s Skidaway Institute of Oceanography where they will be loaded onto the Research Vessel Savannah. The research cruise will head out to sea in the first week of November. Image Credit: Brett Bolton, UNCW CORMP

 

The buoys are maintained by Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program at the University of North Carolina Wilmington Center for Marine Science with funding from the NOAA led U.S. IOOS and SECOORA. Access UNCW CORMP buoy data here.

Using Ocean Technology to Capture Hurricane Matthew in Real Time

As Matthew moved from the Bahamas to the Carolinas, ocean observing technology – such as buoys - captured waves over 20 feet and wind speed of over 50 knots along its’ path.

Overview

Hurricane Matthew was the first category 5 Atlantic hurricane since 2007.  After wreaking havoc in the Caribbean, Matthew started its path along the southern Atlantic seaboard of the US as a category 3 hurricane, eventually making landfall as a category 1 hurricane north of Charleston, SC on Oct. 8. Maximum sustained winds were near 120 mph during the US portion of its track.  The Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing System (SECOORA) responded to the storm in real time.

SECOORA, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, coordinates coastal and ocean monitoring activities in the southeast United States in partnership with NOAA, U.S. IOOS and a number of other public and private interests. SECOORA supports marine weather buoys and high frequency radar coastal stations located in the impact zone of Matthew. One buoy operated by University of North Carolina Wilmington reported wind speed of over 42 knots or 48 mph.

Data

Buoys, coastal stations, forecast models and other ocean technology transmit data – such as wind speed and wave height – in near real time to data servers and portals.

Near real time data is used by weather forecasters and Emergency Response Managers to confirm what the models are predicting and report the true conditions. It helps them accurately decide the best way to respond to dangerous situations. 

The SECOORA Data Portal allows visualization of data from multiple sources in near real-time. Our Hurricane Matthew resources page featured 20+ data resources from federal and non-federal partners.

Figure 1: Pictured is the track of Hurricane Matthew and wave buoys on the southeast coast. Buoys reported significant wave heights over 25 feet. 

Figure 2: Pictured is the track of Hurricane Matthew and ocean buoys on the southeast coast. Many of the buoys have sensors that collect metrological data. The buoy in Grays Reef National Marine Sanctuary operated by NOAA transmitted wind speed of 54 knots or 62 mph before the anemometer stopped reporting. 

Damages to Ocean Observing Assets 

Although most ocean observing assets fared well in the storm, some were damaged or went adrift. For example, buoy 41114 operated by the Coastal Data Information Program broke loose during the storm.  These observing assets are critical to all sorts of mariners and other stakeholders that live and work on and near the coast.  SECOORA is working to document damages to this important infrastructure that informs us whether our ocean ‘highways’ are safe to work and play on.

Mark Rosen from Port St Lucie Anglers Club reached out to US IOOS when he noticed the buoy was not reporting. He stated, “As fishermen we [Port St Lucie Anglers Club] rely heavily on the information from buoy 41114. We really appreciate the work involved in keeping that buoy on station.”

Below are descriptions of the ocean observing instruments that were in the incident zone of Matthew, with those that were damaged highlighted in red.  Please contact us if you know of assets that were damaged that are not listed. Click here to download the full excel file that includes information on federal and non federal assets.

SECOORA Region In-situ Assets (Funded Partners) in the incident zone - Post Matthew Impact Assessment  (10/13/2016)

Name

Responsible Party

Display Title

Platform Type

Latitude

Longitude

Status during and after Hurricane Matthew

Notes

Onslow Bay 18M

UNC-Wilmington

ILM2

Fixed Surface Buoy

34.13

-77.71

Operational

This is maintained in collaboration with CDIP (150) - Masonboro Inlet

Onslow Bay 30M

UNC-Wilmington

ILM3

Fixed Surface Buoy

33.98

-77.35

Operational

 

Sunset Beach Buoy 2

UNC-Wilmington

SUN2

Fixed Surface Buoy

33.848

-78.489

Operational

 

Capers Island Buoy 2

UNC-Wilmington

CAP2

Fixed Surface Buoy

32.8

-79.62

Operational

 

Fripp Island Buoy 2

UNC-Wilmington

FRP2

Fixed Surface Buoy

32.28

-80.41

Not transmitting

Suspected damage from Hurricane Matthew (Yet to make site visit)

Lejune Buoy 3

UNC-Wilmington

LEJ3

Fixed Surface Buoy

34.21083333

-76.9525

Operational

 

 

NOAA OA Gray's Reef Mooring

UGA

Gray's Reef

 

Fixed Surface Buoy

31.4

-80.86

Wind sensors down since 8th Oct, they are maintained by NDBC

The Ocean Acidification Sensors maintained by UGA were not affected

 

SECOORA Region High Frequency Radar Assets in the incident zone - Post Matthew Impact Assessment  (10/13/2016)

Name

Responsible Party

Display Title

Latitude

Longitude

Status during and after Hurricane Matthew

Notes

University of North Carolina

CODAR

Duck

36.18

-75.75

Operational

 

University of North Carolina

CODAR

Cape Hatteras

35.26

-75.52

Operational

 

University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

CODAR

Core Banks

34.76

-76.41

Operational

 

University of South Carolina

WERA

Georgetown

33.25

-79.15

Operational

Damages suspected (Yet to make site visit assessment)

University of South Carolina

WERA

Caswell Beach

33.88

-78.11

Operational

Site visit was made. Cables were damaged due to wave action. Site is operational, but cable repairs need to be done. (10/13/2016)

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

WERA

St. Catherine

31.69

-81.13

Down

Possible damages suspected due to Matthew (Yet to make site visit assessment)

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

WERA

Jekyll Island

31.06

-81.41

Operational

Possible damages to antennas suspected (Yet to make site visit assessment)

University of Miami

WERA

Dania Beach

26.08

-80.12

Operational

 

University of Miami

WERA

Virginia Key

25.74

-80.15

Operational

 

University of Miami

WERA

Crandon Park

25.71

-80.15

Operational

 

Florida Atlantic University

CODAR

Haulover Beach, FL

25.91

-80.1

Operational (non- real-time)

Not funded by SECOORA

Florida Atlantic University

CODAR

Hillsboroug River, FL

26.26

-80.08

Operational (non real-time)

Not funded by SECOORA

SECOORA Seeks Marketing Services Contractor

SECOORA seeks a professional contractor to provide strategic planning services. The Marketing Services Contractor will work with the Executive Director, SECOORA staff and Board members to develop an overarching marketing plan for SECOORA. Click here for detailed information.

SECOORA Newsletter

New SECOORA newsletter! Read about Hurricane Matthew, a new global ocean acidification portal, the SECOORA Glider Observatory and more!

New Blog! Read Insights on Hurricane Matthew

SECOORA has started a new blog. Posts will be written by the SECOORA team or invited experts in the coast and ocean sciences and will cover anything from new technology to insight on events in the region – such as hurricanes, red tide, etc.

Our goal is to use this platform to increase awareness of our coastal ocean and create an open dialogue.  We are committed to sharing coastal and ocean information from trusted SECOORA partners in the southeast region. Click here for Hurricane Matthew resources page.

Read two posts on Hurricane Matthew from Ruoying He, North Carolina State University.

Training the Next Generation

SECOORA, US IOOS and University of South Florida College of Marine Science (USF CMS) hosted two interns over the summer.  Under the mentorship of Dave Easter (US IOOS), Jay Law (USF CMS) and Vembu Subramanian (SECOORA), the undergraduate students learned hands-on the importance of coastal ocean observing.

Julianna Diehl, an undergraduate student at the Maine Maritime Academy, completed her project titled, “Deploying Buoys to Monitor and Model Circulation on the West Florida Shelf.” Juliana worked with USF Ocean Circulation Group gained experience setting up instrumentation, outfitting moorings for deployment, and creating cruise and dive plans. Juliana executed those plans as Chief Scientist on board the R/V Weatherbird II during an annual mooring maintenance cruise.

Andrew Reid, an undergraduate student at East Carolina University, completed his project, “Ocean Observing and Ocean Acidification in the Coastal Ocean.”  Andrew executed deployment of state of the art ocean acidification sensors on an existing ocean-atmosphere research mooring in the Gulf of Mexico. Utilizing the USF Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System field program funded by SECOORA, Andrew assisted and took a lead role in the planning, execution and recovery of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon sensors.

Thank you to Jay Law at USF CMS Coastal Ocean Monitoring & Prediction System for his efforts in mentoring the interns. Julianna and Andrew were participating in the NOAA Office of Education’s Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program. Below are some photos from the internship.

 

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Images credit: Jay Law, USF CMS

SECOORA Glider Observatory

To address long-standing gaps on the east coast, SECOORA invested in a regional glider network to gather historically lacking data on shelf circulation and water properties in the South Atlantic Bight.

Four gliders deployed September 2016 traversed through the footprints of SECOORA funded assets - high frequency radar, buoys and SABGOM model output. Two gliders navigated along the shelf, one along the slope and the last profiled Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary. Below are pictures from the deployment.

The effort was part of the SECOORA Regional Glider Observatory Network composed of experts and gliders from five universities.

Gliders were equipped with CTD sensors and acoustic receivers, a Vemco VMT receiver (animal telemetry data), and a “remore” receiver (acoustics data) from the Ocean Tracking Network and NOAA (thank you!). The gliders were recently retrieved and all data is available on the US IOOS Glider Data Assembly Center.

Project Principal Investigators:

  • Catherine Edwards, University of Georgia Skidaway of Institute of Oceanography
  • Chad Lembke, University of South Florida College of Marine Science
  • Harvey Seim, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Marine Sciences
  • Ruoying He, North Carolina State University Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Fumin Zhang from the Georgia Institute of Technology

Glider Information:

  • Bass - University of South Florida College of Marine Science
    Deployment Location: Port Canaveral, Florida
  • Ramses - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Deployment Location: Port Canaveral, Florida
  • Modena – University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography
    Deployment Location: Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary in Georgia
  • Salacia – North Carolina State University
    Deployment Location: Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary in Georgia

Thank You
A special thank you to Eric Reyier and Doug Scheidt (NASA) and Jared Halonen, Todd Recicar, Kim Roberson, and Sarah Fangman (GRNMS) for deployment support and donated ship time. Thank you also Ocean Tracking Network and NOAA for loaning your Vemco VMT  and “remore” receivers for the gliders. Lastly, thank you Susan Barbieri (FWC/FWRI) for loacing a Vemco VMT transceiver.

Save the Date – SECOORA Annual Meeting

Mark your calendars for the SECOORA 2017 Annual Meeting - May 16, 17 and 18, 2017 - in Melbourne, Florida hosted by Florida Institute of Technology. SECOORA will be celebrating our 10- year anniversary of becoming a non-profit. Keep a look out for more information and a website. Hope to see you there!

Hurricane Matthew

** NEW BLOG: Read posts on Matthew from experts in the Southeast Region **

Hurricane Matthew, a category 3 hurricane at 8 AM ET October 7, moved up the southeast coast, eventually making landfall as a category 1 hurricane just north of Charleston, SC on Oct. 8. Maximum sustained winds were near 120 mph during the US portion of its track. NOAA National Hurricane Center (NOAA NHC) accurately forecasted its track up the southeastern coast. The US IOOS Regional Associations - CariCOOS, MARACOOS, and SECOORA - captured the storm in real time.

Pictured is NOAA’s National Hurricane Centers predicted track for Matthew displayed on the SECOORA Data Portal. Each hexagon represents the number of real time data sensors in the area. Use the SECOORA Data portal to explore, download and visualize ocean and coastal data in Matthew’s Path.

SECOORA Observing and Modeling Assets Relevant to Matthew

Buoys

Matthew is predicted to traverse through the South Atlantic Bight. SECOORA and US IOOS support marine weather buoys off of the coast of North Carolina and South Carolina.

 

Pictured is data from the Fripp Nearshore 2 Buoy. University of North Carolina Wilmington Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program operates the buoys. Contact Lynn Leonard, UNCW, for more information. In case Matthew's moves west, view the SECOORA and US IOOS funded marine weather buoys, C10, C12 and C13, in the Gulf of Mexico.

 

High Frequency Radar

High Frequency (HFR) use radar technology to map surface currents in real-time.  SECOORA and US IOOS support many HFR systems along the South Atlantic Bight. Pictured below is Matthew’s predicted track over our assets.

3 WERA High Frequency radars in south Florida (Crandon Park on Key Biscayne, Virginia Key and John U Lloyd Park on Dania Beach) operated byNick Shay, University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, for more information. Click here for data.

3 CODAR radar installations on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The radars are located at Duck, Cape Hatteras and Core Banks. The radars are operated by Harvey Seim, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Click here for data.

2 WERA radar installations are along the Georgia coasts. The radars are located at St. Catherine's Island (since 2006) and Jekyll Island (since 2010). The radars are operated by Dana Savidge, University of Georgia, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. Note: An alternate sampling strategy is being used for the the two radar systems to make measurements under hurricane Matthew. Systems may appear offline. Click here for data.

2 WERA radar installations are monitoring Long Bay, SC. The radars are located at Fort Caswell, NC and Georgetown, SC.). The radars are operated George Voulgaris, University of South Carolina. Click here for data.

3 CODAR radar and 2 WERA radar installations are monitoring the West Florida Shelf. The CODAR systems are located at Redington Shores, Venice and Naples. The WERA systems are located at Fort DeSoto and Venice. The radars are operated by Robert Weisberg, University of South Florida. Click here for data

Data Portal

Getting a multilayer integrated overlay of data during a storms passing is important. 

When a storm is approaching, use the SECOORA Data Portal sensors map to see the storm data in real time or overlay the SABGOM Model Potential Temperature layer to see the water temperature Matthew will encounter (pictured above). Click here to access SABGOM Model data produced by Ruoying He, North Carolina State University.

Other Resources

SECOORA Data Portal

The SECOORA Data portal is a tool to explore, download and visualize ocean and coastal data in the SECOORA domain. When a storm is approaching, check out the sensors map to see the storm data in real time.

SECOORA Marine Weather Portal

The Marine Weather Portal (MWP) provides marine observations, forecasts and short and long-fuse warnings for the coastal waters of North Carolina, South Carolina and northern Georgia and the Atlantic and Gulf Coast areas of the Southern Region. Click here to access the MWP.

Note: We are in the process of upgrading the MWP and Please use caution while using the same as some data layers may not be available.

University of South Florida’s Coastal Ocean Monitoring and Prediction System (USF COMPS)

USF COMPS consists of an array of instrumentations along the West Florida Shelf.  The data collected supports the a variety of management issues, including more accurate predictions of coastal flooding by storm surge, safety and efficiency of marine navigation, search and rescue efforts, and fisheries management. . Buoy data from C12 in the Gulf of Mexico is pictured on the right. Access data here.

University of North Carolina Wilmington Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (UNCW CORMP)

 

The University of North Carolina Wilmington's Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (CORMP), established in 2000, operates nine mooring stations in North Carolina and South Carolina. Access data here.

Long Bay Observing System

The Coastal Carolina University operators near real time instruments along the coast of South Carolina. Click here to access the data.

Indian River Lagoon LOBO Systems

The Florida Atlantic University Harbor Branch operates Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory (LOBO) units in the Indian River Lagoon and St. Lucie Estuary on the east coast of Florida. Click here to access data.

USGS Coastal Hazards Portal

U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Coastal Change Hazards Portal is an interactive portal that allows you access to forecasts on the probability of dune erosion, overwash, and inundation/flooding. The portal is updated regularly as new NOAA surge forecasts are issued and include the impacts of waves and wave runup. Click here to access data.

SABGOM Model

 
The South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico (SABGOM) is an integrated ocean circulation, wave, atmosphere, and marine ecosystem prediction system for the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico. The SABGOM prediction system is a 3-dimensional, high-resolution regional nowcast/forecast system incorporating the ROMS model for circulation, the WRF model for atmospheric circulation, the SWAN model for surface waves. Click here for data.
CNAPS
The Coupled Northwest Atlantic Prediction System (CNAPS) si a three-dimensional marine environment nowcast and forecast model developed by the Ocean Observing and Modeling Group at North Carolina State University. It covers the entire footprint of Matthew. This fully coupled ocean circulation, wave, and atmosphere model predicts conditions over a wide area of the coastal northwest Atlantic Ocean based on data collected daily. Click here for Data.
Storm Surge Modeling System
The Advanced Coastal Modeling System (ACMS) which is a 2D/3D realtime forecasting system for coastal surge, wave, and salinity developed by the University of Florida team of Drs. Peter Sheng, Vladimir Paramygin, and Justin Davis. Click here to access data.

Altimeter-Derived Atlantic Oceanic Heat Content (OHC) Variability

Operated by Nick Shay, University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, the satellite-derived ocean heat content represents the integrated heat from the surface to the depth. Click here to access data.

WERA Surface Currents/Waves

The University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences is currently operating three WERA High Frequency radars in Crandon Park on Key Biscayne, Virginia Key and John U Lloyd Park on Dania Beach. The radars at Crandon Park transmit at 16MHz, Virginia Key and Dania Beach transmit at 12MHz and provide measurement of currents on the ocean's surface over a large area of the ocean off Miami, FL. The most recent hourly average surface current data is plotted on a 2.4 km grid here.

Surfline Camera Network

 
The Surfline camera network gives a real time look into the ocean conditions. They have cameras located all across the US. With many cameras in the SECOORA domain, choose a location and view the waves.

NOAA National Hurricane Center

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) is a component of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The NHC is the trusted source for best watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather. Visit their website for most up to date information. 

Weatherflow StormTrack 

StormTrack allows you to see the latest predicted track of an identified storm. By using their wealth of real time observations, meteorological tools, and precision models, you can see exactly how each storm is progressing. Each storm page grants access to premium level data for the duration of the storm.   Click here to access the StormTrack.

Coastal Emergency Risks Assessment (CERA) 
CERA is a component of the Advanced Surge Guidance System (ASGS). Based on the Advanced Circulation and Storm Surge model (ADCIRC), coupled with the SWAN Wave model, the ASGS generates real-time storm surge guidance for updating emergency response groups during a tropical or hurricane event. The CERA web application provides an easy-to-use interactive web interface which allows emergency managers to quickly evaluate critical situations. Information and maps related to the official hurricane advisories as issued by the National Hurricane Center are available every six hours during a storm. Click here to access CERA.

Jyotika’s Storm Blog

A fun and educational blog concerning tropical storms and witty weather forecasting. From baby blobs to hectic hurricanes, from sci-fi to classic literature, this blog combines science and humor to inform and entertain. Click here to access the blog.

MARACOOS Blog

The IOOS region in the Mid-Atlantic, MARACOOS, operates a blog that analyzes the storm. Explore the blog for more information: http://maracoos.org/blogs/main/

CariCOOS Hurricane

The IOOS region in the Caribbean, CariCOOS, has a Hurricane Season page the produces the most up to date information on hurricanes in the Atlantic. http://www.caricoos.org/hurricane-season

Florida Institute of Technology

ADCIRC Surge Guidance System (ASGS): Robert Weaver, FIT is running the Florida Indian River Lagoon (IRL) forecasting model for Hurricane Matthew based most recent data from the NHC advisory. The model is run twice a day using the most recent data from NHC advisory.  Click here for NHC advisory 33 IRL surge forecast run results.

The 33 NHC advisory forecast run has increased potential for storm surge in the southern ML in the IRL, the scale for the legend reflects the increase in flooding potential.The barrier island in S mosquito lagoon overtops, this is consistent with earlier predictions. Wabasso also consistently is forecast to have  3-4 m of surge.

Note: Results will be available as long as the resources are available and computer keeps running and producing.

NOAA's nowCOAST
NOAA's nowCOAST displays present and future environmental conditions for coastal and marine users by integrating data and information from across NOAA, other federal agencies, and regional ocean and weather observing systems. This GIS-based online web mapping service provides frequently updated weather and ocean observations, coastal and marine weather warnings and forecasts, and National Hurricane Center potential storm surge flooding map. Click here for data.
Storm QuickLook for Hurricane Matthew
When NOAA issues a tropical storm warning for the U.S. or its territories, the Storm QuickLook is activated. This online tool is a snapshot of near real-time coastal and weather observations for areas affected by a storm. A map shows the location of tide gauges in reference to storm information, followed by an overview of current conditions and links to the latest NWS advisories.  Data available includes time-series plots of water level and meteorological data at selected locations are updated in near real-time every 6 minutes. Following significant storms, CO-OPS will also issue post-storm data reports displaying verified water level measurements during the storm and highlighting maximum storm tide and storm surge at locations affected by the storm. Click here for data.

USGS Flood Event Viewer

The USGS Flood Event Viewer (FEV) is the public data discovery component of the Short-Term Network (STN) database. It features 200+ USGS storm surge sensors and rapid deployment real-time gauges. Access Data >

Weather-Ready Nation Ambassador™

As a Weather-Ready Nation Ambassador™, SECOORA is committed to working with NOAA and other Ambassadors to strengthen national resilience against extreme weather.  Click here to read more about WRN.Explore SECOORA partners and member organization hurricane support resources by clicking here.

 

Email abbey@secoora.org if you have any questions.

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Disclaimer: The observational models and resources made available on this page are SECOORA partner contributions. If you are making an evacuation decision, please heed your local emergency management and the National Hurricane Center's official forecast and the National Weather Service announcements.