May 9, 2019

Public Forum | Hurricanes and Climate: What does the data show?

North Carolina is still recovering from the 2018 hurricane season. The devastating impacts of Florence are still be felt throughout the region.   As the climate is changing – and hurricanes become more frequent –scientists are working hard to make sure communities are prepared to face the next storm.On June 17 at 6:30 PM, at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, learn from experts on how they are using data, and ingenuity, to increase our understanding of hurricanes and the changing climate.

October 25, 2018

SECOORA and GCOOS Teamed to Inspire Future Ocean Experts at the St. Petersburg Science Festival

SECOORA and Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System (GCOOS) partnered to teach the community about navigation, ports, and ocean observing at the St. Petersburg Science Festival, a two day event that took place October 19-20, 2018, in St. Petersburg, FL.

November 17, 2017

First SECOORA Corporate Sponsor!

SECOORA welcomes its first Corporate Silver Sponsor - Georgia Aquarium. A new program by SECOORA, Corporate Sponsorship includes unique opportunities to: influence investments in coastal and ocean observing, build relationships with the coastal ocean observing community, increase your brand’s visibility, and empower students and the public to engage with coastal ocean data. Learn more about corporate sponsorship today.  

September 26, 2017

Webinar: A year and a Hurricane Apart: Nutrient Loading in the St. Lucie Estuary in the Summers of 2016 and 2017

Join us for a webinar on Tuesday - October 3, 2017, 2 PM ET. Dr. Ian Walsh, Sea-Bird Scientific, will provide a perspective on how the sources of nutrients and high flow events change the environment in the St. Lucie Estuary. Reserve your spot now! 

June 26, 2017

SECOORA at NMEA 2017

SECOORA is representing the U.S. IOOS Regional Associations at the National Marine Educators Association Meeting (NMEA) meeting in Charleston, SC. We will be presenting a poster on how to bring data into the classroom using IOOS regional data portals. Click here for a PDF of the poster.

June 22, 2017

Tropical Storm Cindy

Tropical Storm Cindy has made landfall along the Gulf Coast early Thursday morning. Follow the storms path in the new Marine Weather Portal! Use the tool to get rapid access to coastal and ocean weather and sea condition data, including marine-based warnings, watches, and advisories issued by the National Weather Service.

October 5, 2016

Hurricane Matthew

** NEW BLOG: Read posts on Matthew from experts in the Southeast Region ** Hurricane Matthew, a category 3 hurricane at 8 AM ET October 7, moved up the southeast coast, eventually making landfall as a category 1 hurricane just north of Charleston, SC on Oct. 8. Maximum sustained winds were near 120 mph during … Continue reading "Hurricane Matthew"

August 31, 2016

Tropical Storm Hermine and Tropical Depression Eight Passing Over SECOORA Assets

Tropical Depression Eight and Tropical Storm Hermine are dousing the SECOORA region.Tropical Depression EightTropical Depression Eight is moving slowly away from the North Carolina coastline. According to the National Hurricane Center it is centered about 75 miles east-southeast of Cape Hatteras.SECOORA and US IOOS support marine weather buoys off of the coast of North Carolina and South Carolina. The weather sensors on the buoys captured the data of Tropical Depression Eight in real time.Pictured above is 1 week data plot from buoy ILM3. Monday August 29 and Tuesday August 30 is when the storm passed over the University of North Carolina Wilmington Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program buoys. Contact Lynn Leonard, UNCW, for more information. Or visit the CORMP page to explore more data.   For warnings and briefings visit the NWS Wilmington NC website.Tropical Storm Hermine Wednesday August 31, Tropical Depression Nine was upgraded to Tropical Storm Hermine (pronounced “her MEEN”). According to the NWS Tampa Bay Weather Forecast Office, the storm is forecast to gradually strengthen as it lifts northward then northeast, eventually making landfall across the eastern Florida Panhandle and Big Bend region on Thursday. The system is forecast to slowly intensify over the next ...

August 22, 2016

Dr. Bill Hogarth Honored with Top Fishery Conservation Award

Pictured is Dr. Bill Hogarth (right) with fellow SECOORA Members at the SECOORA 2015 Annual MeetingRecently retired Florida Institute of Oceanography Director Bill Hogarth was honored with the Carl R. Sullivan Fishery Conservation Award by the American Fisheries Society. Also known as the “Sully,” the award is one of the nation’s premier honors in fisheries conservation science.“No one deserves the ‘Sully’ more than Dr. Hogarth. As the past SECOORA Vice Chair, Dr. Hogarth provided valuable input on the importance of fisheries in ocean observing,” reflected SECOORA’s Executive Director Debra Hernandez. “His career has made a noteworthy impact on the fisheries community, including all the linked economic and ecosystem interests impacted by fisheries management.”The award recognizes a wide span of achievements in Dr. Hogarth’s 51-year-career in marine science, beginning with his research into threatened fish species; his roles as director of the National Marine Fisheries Service and chairman of the International Whaling Commission; and his service as the former dean of the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science and Director of the Florida Institute of Oceanography. During his career, Hogarth is credited with bringing greater international attention to preserving threatened fish species such as the Atlantic Blue Fin ...

August 11, 2016

Atlantic Hurricane Season Still Expected to be Strongest Since 2012

In its updated 2016 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, NOAA calls for a higher likelihood of a near-normal or above-normal season, and decreases the chance of a below-normal season to only 15 percent, from the initial outlook issued in May. The season is still expected to be the most active since 2012.Forecasters now expect a 70-percent chance of 12–17 named storms, of which 5–8 are expected to become hurricanes, including 2–4 major hurricanes. The initial outlook called for 10–16 named storms, 4–8 hurricanes, and 1–4 major hurricanes. The seasonal averages are 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes and 3 major hurricanes. Read the story on the NOAA website.